Tag: protectionism

The following article from The Economist looks at the role of imports in stimulating economic development in developing countries. It questions the simple perception of many people, not least politicians, that exports are good, but imports are bad. Far from merely being a drain on the balance of payments and a threat to domestic industries, imports can provide both useful competitive pressures and access to intermediate goods.

Opening the floodgates The Economist (7/3/09)
(The paper referred to in The Economist article above)

Questions

  1. How can reducing trade barriers and thereby reducing the price of imports help a developing country?
  2. Consider whether the total removal of trade barriers would be desirable for developing countries.
  3. Explain what is meant by “But the Indian variant of creative destruction seemed unusually benign” and why this was so.
  4. Why has it proved so difficult to secure an international agreement to reduce trade barriers under the Doha trade round?

In an earlier news item we saw that the global recession has hit the demand for organic produce. The same is not true for Fairtrade products as a global survey published on 17/4/09 shows (see). Awareness of Fairtrade products continues to grow as do sales. The articles below look at the findings of this survey and at the explanations behind it.

UK: Fairtrade Flows Against Economic Tide Namnews (20/4/09)
The government must act on fair trade now Public Service Review: International Development Issue 13 (20/4/09)
Fairtrade a hit with shoppers as demand rises despite credit crunch Glasgow Daily Record (17/4/09)
Link to short videos from the Fairtrade Foundation; Link to facts and figures on Fairtrade Fairtrade Foundation

Questions

  1. Consider the reasons why Fairtrade sales have increased while sales of organic produce have declined.
  2. Does purchasing Fairtrade products mean that consumers are not seeking to maximise their consumer surplus?
  3. What economic challenges face Fairtrade producers? How should governments help the Fairtrade movement?
  4. Is the liberalisation of trade in the interests of Fairtrade producers?

Large areas of land in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe are lying uncultivated due to export barriers and tariffs. Given the recent rapid rise in food prices, this fallow land (estimated to be around 23 million hectares) could help to reduce upward pressure on food prices.

Bread basket that is left to grow weeds Times Online (12/3/08)

Questions

1. Identify three different forms of protectionism.
2. Explain why the land identified in the article has remained uncultivated.
3. Discuss the arguments for and against these countries reducing tariffs on food.

In the article below, Irwin Stelzer argues that Congress has adopted a more protectionist stance towards trade policy. Not all would, however, agree. Why not have a look at the comments after the article to see some of the discussion that has taken place about the article?

The end of free trade as we know it Times Online (20/5/07)


Questions
1. Assess the extent to which the new trade agreements under discussion are likely to improve the position of workers globally.
2. Analyse two policies that the US administration could put in place to reduce the level or protectionism.
3. Discuss the extent to which the new trade agreements referred to in the article will represent a more protectionist approach to trade.